CLICK PLAY for full experienceSoundscape by pastelShade
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Welcome to our virtual gallery...

Featured are cards, letters, artworks, informational graphics, questions to reflect on, video footage and photographs of #Jailbeddrop. This floor plan mimics the current exhibit on view at SoLA Contemporary (for press only due to COVID_19 restrictions). 

To interact with graphic, click on the desired wall description and you will be directed to that section to view artworks and items on display, read the timeline presented on the wall, etc.

Or simply scroll down the page to move through the gallery room by room.

Soundscape for virtual experience is by pastelShade. Joy enthusiast and artist pastelShade (they/them) is curious about cultivating ecstatic on the dance floor and supporting the resiliency available through body movement, vocal exercise and memory in relationship to music. 

Photos by Domia Edwards & Jean Park

Videos by Jean Park

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SoLA x JAILBEDDROP

#Jailbeddrop is an extension of Justice LA's Jail Bed Drop project series, a creative intervention started by Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, and Cecilia Sweet-Coll. For the first time since its inception in 2017, #Jailbeddrop has been reimagined into a full gallery exhibition.

The exhibition, June 4-6, 2020, will be SoLA Contemporary's first show as California reopens. All precautions to safely facilitate gallery walkthroughs (for press only) will be adhered to, as well as ensuring the exhibit, which incorporates workshops, talks and performances with live-streams on Instagram at @jailbeddrop and @solacontemporary.

Rooted in challenging our inherent notion between crime and punishment, #Jailbeddrop contextualized and facilitates a space to explore interpersonal accountability and reflect those values back on our "criminal justice system". The #Jailbeddrop signature performance consists of movement by Brianna Mims, and spoken word, by Bindhu Swaminathan, and explores concepts of vulnerability, agency, accountability, rest, touch and dignity apropos healing.

#Jailbeddrop is curated by Brianna Mims, Georgina Grkikian and Mihn-Han Vu.

 

Rooted in challenging our inherent notion between crime and punishment, #Jailbeddrop contextualized and facilitates a space to explore interpersonal accountability and reflect those values back on our "criminal justice system". The #Jailbeddrop signature performance consists of movement by Brianna Mims, and spoken word, by Bindhu Swaminathan, and explores concepts of vulnerability, agency, accountability, rest, touch and dignity apropos healing.

#Jailbeddrop is curated by Brianna Mims,

Georgina Grkikian and Mihn-Han Vu.

 

SoLA X JBD

Converse Artist Statements

(from left to right, according to second image)

 

Karla Diaz (Artist)

“I designed my shoes thinking of the women who are in prison. My brother is currently serving a life prison sentence here in California. Throughout my year of communication with him, I learned about the experience of men in jail. However, my interest has always been in empowering women’s voices. 

Last year, I got to teach a workshop with women incarcerated in Chino facilitated by the Prison Arts Collective. These shoes are inspired by the women and our conversations. The shoes are named “Freedom Con Shoes” has a double meaning. I took it from a woman in Chino’s Prison. Her knowledge of English was limited and we spoke mainly in Spanish. When I asked her about her favorite shoes, she said “Freedom Con (with in Spanish) Shoes.” But “Con” also means convict. 

The shoes are Pink because it’s a color of resistance against the institutionalized prison uniforms given to prisoners. The inside is painted a pink that glows in the dark to light the way of the person that wears it. The soles inside include a map of all of the prisons in California. On the side of the shoes, I have embroidered the images of two of the women I worked with in Chino and their hands breaking their handcuffs. This symbolizes freedom. I chose to embroider this image as it is usually an intimate method of application, usually passed on from mothers to daughters, to granddaughters. This is how I learned to use embroidery—to embroider my family’s narratives.”

 

Artworks on Wall

(from incarcerated artists at Cal State Prison)

 

Kenneth Webb (Artist)

As a juvenile Kenneth Webb was sentenced to 50 to life. Studied with the founding Chairman Christian Branscombe and ten years later he is the Chairman of Healing Through Art (HTA), a program that does not exist anywhere else in CDCR. He has and continues to carry the torch of founding members in an attempt to invest in his peers, the community, and live a life of living amend in the true spirit of restorative justice. A progressive and inspiring voice that was never meant to be heard from again.

 

Andre Simmons (Artist)

“For my converse, I chose to illustrate an excerpt of a letter from someone inside writing home about his surroundings. My first memories in connection with prison was my brother sharing the letters he received from his father who was locked away when we were kids. The emotion in the words left a lasting impression. It was clear to me even way back then that conditions inside weren't ideal for the human spirit."

 

Gloria Sanchez (Artist)

“My work is dedicated to my good friend and hermano who I grew up with in the Los Angeles Harbor Area town of Wilmington, Julian Sedillo. Julian has been in prison since 2012 for retaliating against a man who killed our friends, James Dominguez, who was blasted with a shotgun from behind while driving home from work. Julian's parole is not until 2032, and this has been unbearable for his family, and of course a burdening detour for himself.

On one shoe, I painted a landscape of the ocean sunset near our home, set at Chowingna (San Pedro coast); a view I hope he will be able to enjoy with his loved ones sooner than later. On another shoe, I painted a bird in flight as a metaphor for his freedom. Julian's maternal family are descendants of Yoeme (Yaqui) Native Ancestry, and within my research for this workI found a journal on the preservation of Yoeme Language. Within this journal, I found a saying: "Senu ili Wiiiikit, Alamre Haulapo Chuuu'ak," which translates to: "One little bird got stuck in a wire cage." I embroidered this on fabric representing the present state he is in. The shoes and photos of local, familiar places from our community are symbols of his future state, I am praying for. I am setting succulents down as a symbol of resilience, as well as rocks and shells that are site specific to where the ocean sunset imagery comes from--as an affirmation that he will experience that space in time."

 

Jasmine Nyende (Artist)

“For my design I depict a structure exploding. The colors blend, melt into each other to destroy a static institution underneath. I used a photograph of a prison as a stencil, markers, spray and acrylic paint to call in the transformation of trauma into creativity as a fight to the system."

 

Anna Evans-Goldstein (Artist)

“Having a loved one incarcerated is like one prolonged traumatic event- the buildup of prison visits and family hurt is difficult to release with language. In my practice the act of creation is most important to me. I allow each purposeful stitch to take something out of me I otherwise can't express. The chaos of the embroidered lines, the regimented patterns of the crotchet and the abundance of colors are externalizations of how my Father's incarceration feels inside me. This release is for myself, my parents, and all my friends and strangers who have had to interact with prison or other forms of state violence."

 

TIMELINE & ARTWORKS

CLICK FOR TIMELINE 

To view our infographics on policies and prison statistics.

 

Victor Tapia 

Tapia came in as a student of Kenneth Webb and has become a professional artist that dedicates his time to contributing to others. His voice is about the community and redemption. The product of a long line of people teaching one another in the art room at Lancaster State Prison.

 

Kenneth Webb (Out of Bounds)

As a juvenile Kenneth Webb was sentenced to 50 to life. Studied with the founding Chairman Christian Branscombe and ten years later he is the Chairman of Healing Through Art (HTA), a program that does not exist anywhere else in CDCR. He has and continues to carry the torch of founding members in an attempt to invest in his peers, the community, and live a life of living amend in the true spirit of restorative justice. A progressive and inspiring voice that was never meant to be heard from again.

 

 

GEODESIC DOME

1/8

'Dome Climber'

The dome climber is built to resemble so many of our childhood parks, but once put into context of performance it represents the prison industrial complex (PIC) and its interconnectedness to every part of the U.S's systems and economy..

 

What makes you feel safe?

What does dignity mean to you? What makes you feel you have a sense of dignity?

What would you like to see in your community?

Is human touch important to you? If so, why?

 

Cal State Prison Art Wall

Christian Branscombe

 

Victor Tapia 

 

Kenneth Webb

 

Kenneth Webb

 

 

QUESTIONS TO REFLECT ON

CLICK FOR CALLS TO ACTION 

To view what you can do to help.

 

In situations where ourselves or our family members have experienced acts of violence--when we say "we want justice we deserve," what does that mean? What does justice look like?

How can systems and policies within education, housing, mental health services, and environmental policies be altered or created to facilitate some level of public safety, accountability and/or care?

If we're thinking about someone who has committed acts of violence, why is that kind of violence possible? -Angela Davis

How do you practice accountability in your personal relationships? How are those values reflected or not reflected in our "criminal justice system"?

What makes someone deserving of imprisonment?

 
 

PREVIOUS JAILBEDDROP EXPERIENCES

PROJECTION INCLUDES MOVEMENT PIECE BY BRIANNA MIMS

ART WALL

Christian Branscombe (Artist)

 

Founding member of Healing Through Art (HTA). Who had Life Without the Possibility of Parole (LWOP) and was commuted by Governor Brown and was granted freedom by the Board of Prison Hearings. A dedicated Restorative Justice Advocate.

 

 

BEDROOM

JAIL

BED

FLOWERS

Representation of life within the room and the transition into a sacred space

6' x 8'

PRISON

CELL SIZE

Bedroom Details

(with items donated by people directly and

indirectly affected by incarceration)

 

The room is sized to match the average dimension of our nation’s prison cells— grapples with the degradation of our relationship to safe spaces that occurs when incarcerated. Inside the room, there are significant items and pieces of art collected from system impacted people. The room serves as an altar space to honor and hold space for folks.

 

Collection of Items

(includes cards, letters, books, handmade works, artworks, candles and incense donated to Jailbeddrop)

 

 

Space of Rest

1/3

DEFUND. Resist. REST.

This space is meant for reflecting, processing, and simply resting post experience. Furthermore, we must prioritize rest as a practice for individual and collective liberation.

Resources for Rest:

https://thenapministry.wordpress.com

https://iheartintelligence.com/types-rest-your-mind-body-need-besides-sleeping/

https://www.precisionbodyworks.net/blog/what-type-of-rest-serves-you-best